POEM: Peter, George, John, Joseph, Silas, Henry and Tom

Photo of the site of the battle by Jason Crane.

Peter, George, John, Joseph, Silas, Henry and Tom

pop!pop!pop!

Pinkerton rifles filling the air
with smoke & screams & blood

pop!pop!pop!

men of iron & steel
men of flesh & bone

pop!pop!pop!

the ground soaks up the evidence
the birds scatter; no witnesses

now: the furnaces shut, rusting
mud colors the Monongahela

two robins rest on a sign
listing the names of the dead

/ / /

Jason Crane
21 Feb 2018
Pittsburgh PA

This poem is inspired by the Battle of Homestead, which took place just down the road from my hotel. On July 2, 1892, Pinkertons hired by a steel company murdered seven striking workers, all members of the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers. Three Pinkertons were also killed. Shortly thereafter the government used the state militia to bust the strike and break the union. The poem’s title is a list of the names of the seven murdered workers.

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PHOTO: 99 South, near Altoona, PA

Photo by Jason Crane. Click to see larger image.

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Smashing bodhisattvas

The other day I wrote a poem called “the bodhisattva of Prospect Ave (all praise to Jah)” after a walk I took around town. Today I took another walk and discovered two things: (1) the statue is on Hamilton Ave, not Prospect; and (2) someone smashed it in the four days since I wrote the poem.

I discovered it had been smashed because I stopped by to pay my respects on my walk. I was very sad and very angry to see it lying there. I know it’s not mine, and it’s an ephemeral object, like all objects, but it still just felt … wrong. I also felt a little relief that I had placed it on the wrong street in my poem, meaning it’s unlikely someone read the poem and decided, “Hey, I dislike Jason, I’m going to go kick over that statue.”

I live in a conservative, wealth-obsessed town full of drunk college kids, and at the moment I saw the statue it was pretty easy to hate this town. That’s not a particularly Buddhist attitude, but it was my honest reaction. It’s been about 20 minutes and I’m back home, sweaty from the walk, but writing before the emotions pass, which they will. I was thinking I might knock on the door of the house with the statue and offer to help them get it fixed, as a way to turn this into something positive.

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Brad Warner on Zen Buddhism as a communal practice

I finished Brad Warner’s Don’t Be A Jerk today for the second time, in preparation for reading his follow-up, It Came From Beyond Zen! Don’t Be A Jerk is described as a “radical but reverent paraphrasing of Dogen’s Treasury of the True Dharma Eye.” That pretty much sums it up. Warner goes through chapters from Dogen’s 800-year-old Zen classic and tries to put them into accessible modern language while not diluting their meaning or impact. You can hear me interview him about this book in the video below:

I thoroughly enjoyed Warner’s paraphrasing of Dogen, but on my second reading I found myself most moved by the final chapter, “Dogen’s Zen In The Twenty-First Century,” in which Warner not only brings Dogen into the present, but also movingly depicts his own current view of Zen after several decades of practice. Rather than paraphrase Warner’s writing, I thought I’d just quote him. (I’ve skipped some bits. Missing bits are replaced by an ellipsis. Also note that “zazen” is seated silent meditation.)

“To me Zen is communal practice of individual deep inquiry. … Throughout human history people have been concerned about the deeper meaning of existence. They wanted to understand who and what they actually were and how they fit into the world. … Among those seekers, there is a certain class of people who try to understand the human condition by sitting very quietly and simply observing themselves in action (even sitting still for long periods is a kind of action; try it sometime if you have any doubts). … Buddhism started not when Shakyamuni had his great revelation by himself. Lots of people had done that before. It began when he made his first efforts to transform that into a communal practice. Although you can – and I think you should – do zazen by yourself, that larger thing we call Zen Buddhism is not something you do by yourself. You can do zazen by yourself. You do Zen Buddhism with other people.”

I think that’s one of the most beautiful summations of Zen Buddhism I’ve read. As someone whose practice has primarily been solitary, it also served as the kick in the pants I needed to find some other folks to sit with. Read the book. You won’t be disappointed.

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POEM: the bodhisattva of Prospect Ave (all praise to Jah)

Photo by Jason Crane

the bodhisattva of Hamilton Ave (all praise to Jah)*

briskly walking (trying to get back
in some sort of shape) I spotted
the bodhisattva beneath a bush

the moss covering him like a robe
the leaves surrounding him
like an offering

at this point in the poem, I very much
want to tell you that I’m listening
to a killer Desmond Dekker track

“Rudie Got Soul” doesn’t have much
to do with a lone bodhisattva
forgotten under a bush

then again, maybe they have
everything
to do with one another

/ / /

Jason Crane
16 February 2018
State College PA

*As you can see from the title of this post, rather than the title of the poem, I had mistakenly placed this statue on Prospect Ave, rather on its true home, Hamilton Ave. Also, in the days since I wrote the poem, someone smashed the statue.

Posted in Buddhism, Music, My poems, Poetry | 1 Comment

Anarchist? Anarcho-curious? Check out these podcasts

I’m an anarchist living in a conservative area. I work as a union organizer for a mainstream union and travel constantly. To maintain a sense of community, especially given how few anarchists I personally run into, one of the places I turn is the world of podcasting. Here are my four favorites. Whether you’re an anarchist or just want to hear views that aren’t covered in the mainstream media, these are all worth checking out.

It’s Going Down

It’s Going Down is a podcast and a robust website. I’ll let them describe themselves: “It’s Going Down is a digital community center from anarchist, anti-fascist, autonomous anti-capitalist and anti-colonial movements. Our mission is to provide a resilient platform to publicize and promote revolutionary theory and action.” Looking for a place to start? I found the audio documentary on San Diego’s Chicano Park very inspiring. Make sure you stay till the song at the end.

The Final Straw Radio

The Final Straw is a weekly radio show produced in Asheville, NC, but covering a range of primarily national and international topics. Each episode is available as a podcast. The interviews are always smart and engaging. I also enjoy the weekly audio column by anarchist prisoner Sean Swain. Looking for a place to start? I enjoyed their recent interview about mutual aid in Puerto Rico.

The Ex-Worker

The Ex-Worker was the first anarchist podcast I listened to. It’s always passionate and well-informed, and often focuses on big-picture ideas that help me as I continue to shape my thoughts on my own approach to anarchism. The Ex-Worker is produced by the folks at CrimethInc., who also put out books, pamphlets, posters, stickers, and a very rich and useful website. Looking for a place to start? Check out their three-part review (1, 2, 3) of 2017. You won’t believe how much stuff happened that you never heard about.

The Hotwire

You’ll notice that The Hotwire has a very similar logo to The Ex-Worker, and that’s not a coincidence. It’s also produced my CrimethInc. Unlike its older sibling, The Hotwire is primarily an anarchist news podcast. It features a round-up of news from around the world with an anarchist bent, and also helps you take action with detailed show notes. Looking for a place to start? Try the most recent episode.

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